Sven Spieker

Karen Benezra (Lüneburg U) holds a PhD in Hispanic Studies with a minor in comparative literature from Cornell University. Her research and teaching interests include twentieth-century Latin American literature, visual art, and critical social and psychoanalytic theory. She is the author of Dematerialization: Art and Design in Latin America (University of California Press, 2020) and editor of Accumulation and Subjectivity: Rethinking Marx in Latin America, forthcoming with the State University of New York Press in early 2022. Karen is currently researching two projects examining Latin American theories of collective life in pre- and post-capitalist societies and the concept of popular art in the short twentieth century in Chile, respectively. A former faculty member at Columbia University, Karen is an assistant professor of art, theory, and critique in the Institute of Philosophy and Art Studies at Leuphana University Lüneburg . Karen has been an editor of the journal ARTMargins since 2012.

Sven Spieker

Rossen Djagalov is an Assistant Professor of Russian at New York University. He is a historian of leftist culture, interested in the linkages between cultural producers and audiences in the USSR and abroad. His book From Internationalism to Postcolonialism: Literature and Cinema between the Second and the Third World (2020) uncovers the Soviet trace in postcolonial literature, film, and ultimately, theory. His second book project, “The People’s Republic of Letters: Towards a Media History of Twentieth-Century Socialist Internationalism,” examines the relationship between the political left and the different media (proletarian novel, singer-songwriter performance, political documentary film) that at different times played a major role in connecting its publics globally. He was an organizer for Yales Graduate Student Union (GESO) and is a member of the editorial collective of LeftEast.

Sven Spieker

Nergis Ertürk is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Pennsylvania State University and co-editor (with Tom Beebee) of the journal Comparative Literature Studies. Her research interests include modern Turkish literature, culture, and intellectual history, Central Eurasian and Middle Eastern Marxist aesthetics and politics, and East-East literary relations. She is the author of Grammatology and Literary Modernity in Turkey (Oxford University Press, 2011), the recipient of the 2012 Modern Language Association Prize for a First Book, and the co-editor (with Özge Serin) of a 2016 special issue of boundary 2 entitled Marxism, Communism, and Translation. Her work has also appeared in the journals PMLA, Modernism/Modernity, boundary 2, New Literary History, Interventions, Middle Eastern Literatures, Comparative Literature, Birikim, and Jadaliyya. She recently completed the manuscript of her second monograph, a study of revolutionary aesthetics and politics across Turkey and the Soviet Union.

Sven Spieker

Leah Feldman, U of Chicago: My research explores the poetics and the politics of global literary and cultural entanglements, focusing critical approaches to translation theory, semiotics, Marxist aesthetics and anti-colonial theory, which traverse the Caucasus and Central Asia. My book On the Threshold of Eurasia: Orientalism and Revolutionary Aesthetics in the Caucasus (Cornell 2018), winner of the Central Eurasian Studies Society Book Prize, exposes the ways in which the idea of a revolutionary Eurasia informed the interplay between orientalist and anti-imperial discourses in Russian and Azeri poetry and prose. Tracing translations and intertextual engagements across Russia, the Caucasus and western Europe, it offers an alternative vision of empire, modernity and anti-imperialism from the vantage point of cosmopolitan centers in the Russian empire and Soviet Union. I am currently writing on the rise of the New Right in late/post-Soviet Eurasia and a book tentatively titled Feeling Collapse on Soviet film, art and performance from Central Asia and the Caucasus amidst the collapsing sensorium of the Soviet Empire. My work has appeared in Slavic Review, boundary 2, Ab Imperio, and Global South and I serve on the editorial collective for boundary 2. I am also co-writing Azbuka Strikes Back: An Anti-colonial ABCs with the artist collective Slavs & Tatars.

Sven Spieker

Douglas Gabriel is a 2021-22 Getty/ACLS Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Art, and a Visiting Researcher at Seoul National University. His research on North Korean visual culture has appeared in Third Text, Art Journal, and the Journal of Korean Studies. He is currently completing a book project that explores connections between North and South Korean art during the late Cold War period.

Sven Spieker

Amelia Glaser is Associate Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at the University of California — San Diego, where she also holds the Endowed Chair in Judaic Studies. She is currently the Rita E. Hauser Fellow at the Harvard-Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies. Her work lies at the intersection of Russian, Jewish, and Ukrainian literary culture. She has written about the relationship of these three groups in the territory of Ukraine in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is the author of Jews and Ukrainians in Russia’s Literary Borderlands (Northwestern UP, 2012) and Songs in Dark Times: Yiddish Poetry of Struggle from Scottsboro to Palestine (Harvard U.P., 2020). She is the editor of Stories of Khmelnytsky: Competing Literary Legacies of the 1648 Ukrainian Cossack Uprising (Stanford UP, 2015) and, with Steven Lee, Comintern Aesthetics (U. Toronto Press, 2020); she is the translator of Proletpen: America’s Rebel Yiddish Poets (U. Wisconsin Press, 2005). Dr. Glaser is currently at work on a new project about the reconceptualization of identity in Ukrainian art and literature since the 2013-14 Euromaidan protests.

Sven Spieker

Yi GU is an associate professor at University of Toronto. She is a scholar of modern and contemporary art and visual culture, with a focus on Asia especially China. Her research interests include cold war visual culture and post-socialist art, comparative media studies, Chinese photography history and contemporary photography in Asia, mass art and amateurism, and visual methodologies across disciplines. Her book Chinese Ways of Seeing and Open-Air Painting (Harvard University Press Asia Center, 2020) points out an ocular turn of China’s twentieth century as a foundation for a revisionist history of modern Chinese art. She is currently writing a book tentatively entitled “Tu: Aesthetics and the Chinese Communist Party,” and developing research on China’s “Beautiful Countryside” campaign in the context of a rising global fascination with rural revival.

Christine Ho

Christine I. Ho (Organizer) is associate professor of East Asian art history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research focuses on modern and contemporary art, craft, and design in China. The author of Drawing from Life: Socialist Painting and Socialist Realism in the People’s Republic of China (University of California, 2020). She is currently working on two projects: a study of the mural in modern China, and a monograph on the theory, history, and practice of collective production in modern and contemporary Chinese art, entitled Collective Brushwork.

Sam Hodgkin

Sam Hodgkin (Organizer) is an assistant professor of Comparative Literature at Yale University. He has published on the modern verse, theater, and criticism of Iran, Turkey, the Caucasus, and Central Asia. His research engages with theories of representation, translation, and world poetics, and with the history of literary institutions. His current book project, entitled “The Nightingales’ Congress: Literary Representatives in the Communist East,” shows how the Soviet internationalist project of world literature emerged from sustained engagement between leftist writers of West and South Asia and state-sponsored writers of the multinational Soviet East.

Sven Spieker

Cristian Nae, Iash University is Associate Professor of Art History and Theory at George Enescu National University of the Arts in Iași, Romania. His research and teaching focus on exhibition histories and critical art in Central and Eastern Europe after the Second World War. He has published articles on transnational contacts, self-organized exhibitions and trans-regional collaborations during socialism, as well as on the resurgence of nationalism, critical art and decolonial art practices during post-socialism.

Sven Spieker

Kevin M. F. Platt is Professor of Russian and East European Studies and Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania. His recent book projects include Terror and Greatness: Ivan and Peter as Russian Myths (Cornell University Press, 2011) and the edited volume Global Russian Cultures (University of Wisconsin, 2019). He has just completed the manuscript of Border Conditions, a study of history, memory and contemporary cultural life among Russians in Latvia that is expected to be published 2022. His current major project is Cultural Arbitrage: Aesthetics and Global Exchange in the Era of Three Worlds.

Sven Spieker

Sudha Rajagopalan is Senior Lecturer in East European Studies at the University of Amsterdam, with research interests in Soviet cultural history and post-Soviet Russian digital media cultures.  Her current project, Journeys of Soviet Things (submitted for publication in the Routledge Global Cold War Cultures series) is  an oral history of socialist globalisation constructed around the journeys  of Cold War era Soviet objects – household appliances, decorative artefacts, books – in India and Cuba. Her first book, ‘Indian Films in Soviet Cinemas: The Culture of Moviegoing after Stalin’ (Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2009) was a pioneering ethnohistorical study of Soviet movie reception of Bombay cinema. She has also published articles about Russian digital media cultures, engaging with debates on celebrity, identity, post-feminism and memory in the post-Soviet space. Rajagopalan is on the steering committee of the journal Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. She is also the curator of the Prajnya Archives for the visual documentation of women in public life in South Asia (India).

Sven Spieker

Monica Popescu (Organizer) is an Associate Professor of English and William Dawson Scholar of African Literatures at McGill University. She is the author of At Penpoint: African Literatures, Postcolonial Studies and the Cold War (2020, Duke University Press), South African Literature Beyond the Cold War (which won the 2012 Gustave O. Arlt Award in the Humanities), and The Politics of Violence in Post-Communist Films. She co-edited a special issue of the Journal of Postcolonial Writing on Alternative Solidarities: Black Diasporas and Cultural Alliances during the Cold War as well as a special issue of Research in African Literatures on African Literary History and the Cold War. Together with Sandeep Banerjee and Katherine Zien, she is the Series Editor for the Routledge Series in Cultures of the Global Cold War.

Sven Spieker

Polly Savage is Lecturer in the Art History of Africa at SOAS, University of London, and has held teaching posts at Birkbeck College, Goldsmiths College, and Leeds University.  She was previously Assistant Curator at the October Gallery.  Her AHRC-funded doctorate at the Royal College of Art, London explored about the cultural impact of the Cold War in Mozambique.  Her edited volume Making Art in Africa 1960-2010 was published by Lund Humphries in 2014.  She has curated a number of exhibitions, including most recently with Richard Gray, Our Sophisticated Weapon: Posters of the Mozambican Revolution at London’s Brunei Gallery, 2021.

Sven Spieker

Sven Spieker (Organizer) teaches in the Comparative Literature Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He specializes in modern and contemporary art and culture, with an emphasis on Russia and Eastern Europe, and a special interest in issues related to documentary and knowledge production. Spieker has lectured and published on topics ranging from the historical avant-garde (Malevich, Rodchenko, Dziga Vertov) to late 20th-century art practice from Wolfgang Kippenberger to subREAL. His books and articles have appeared in German, Korean, Russian, Swedish, Polish, and English. Spieker’s latest book publication is an edited volume devoted to the relationship between art and destruction (MIT Press/Whitechapel Gallery, 2017). The monograph The Big Archive (2008) focused on the archive as a crucible of European modernism (The Big Archive, MIT Press; Korean translation 2014). Spieker is the founding editor of ARTMargins Print and ARTMargins Online.

Sven Spieker

Sanjukta Sunderason is a historian of 20th-century aesthetics, working on the interfaces of visual art, (left-wing/socialist) political thought, and historical transition during 20th-century decolonization in South Asia and across transnational formations in the Global South. She is the author of Partisan Aesthetics: Modern Art and India’s Long Decolonization (Stanford University Press, 2020) and co-editor (with Lotte Hoek, University of Edinburgh) of Forms of the Left in Postcolonial South Asia: Aesthetics, Networks, and Connected Histories (Bloomsbury, 2021). Her writings have appeared across multiple peer-reviewed journals including Third Text, British Art Studies, South Asian Studies, etc. She is currently working on a second monograph on transnational conceptualizations of art and liberation across 20th-century decolonization, thinking from the locational scales of South Asia. Sanjukta is based the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, where is Senior Lecturer (UD1) in Art History at the University of Amsterdam. She is part of the Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis, and co-coordinator in ongoing and upcoming collectives at UvA like Global Trajectories of Thought and Memory and Decolonial Futures. She lectures and supervises broadly across themes of aesthetics and decolonization, global modernisms, trans-disciplinary cultural theory, postcolonial and decolonial thought

Sven Spieker

Łukasz Stanek is Professor of Architectural History at the University of Manchester, UK. Stanek authored Henri Lefebvre on Space: Architecture, Urban Research, and the Production of Theory (University of Minnesota Press, 2011) and Architecture in Global Socialism: Eastern Europe, West Africa, and the Middle East in the Cold War (Princeton University Press, 2020), which won the Alice Davis Hitchcock Medallion by the SAH GB and the RIBA President’s Award for History & Theory Research. Besides Manchester, Stanek taught at the ETH Zurich, Harvard University GSD, and the University of Michigan.

Sven Spieker

Nicolai Volland is Associate Professor of Asian Studies and Comparative Literature at Penn State University. His research focuses on modern Chinese literature and culture in its transnational dimensions, including cosmopolitanism, transnationalism, translation and transculturation, and he is the author of Socialist Cosmopolitanism: The Chinese Literary Universe, 1945-1965 (Columbia University Press, 2017). He is currently working on two projects: A longitudinal study of the cosmopolitan tradition in modern Chinese literature through the lens of Sino-French literary encounters, and an effort to rethink contemporary Chinese literature from oceanic perspectives.

Sven Spieker

Sarah Ann Wells (Associate Professor of Literary Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison) is a scholar of Latin American literature and film/media studies in a global frame. Her research focuses on the political and aesthetic avant-gardes of the long 20th century in Argentina and Brazil. Media Laboratories: Late Modernist Authorship in South America (Northwestern UP, 2017), her first book, won the Best Book in the Humanities Prize from the Latin American Studies Association’s Southern Cone section. She is also co-editor of Simultaneous Worlds: Global Science Fiction Cinema (University of Minnesota, 2015). Her scholarship has appeared in Modernism/Modernity, The Global South, Luso-Brazilian Review, Comparative Literature, South Atlantic Quarterly, and in the edited volumes Cosmopolitan Film Cultures in Latin America and Comintern Aesthetics, among others. She is currently writing a book on the relationship between labor resistance and film form in world cinema.